Time Mapping International Population of Carnegie Mellon University

collective effort with Emily DeGrandpre, 02 2017.
Carnegie Mellon University is a learning ground for a very diverse group of students from all around the world. Specifically with regards to nationalities, the fundamental question worth asking is how the demographics of student population has changed
over time. We believed exploring this subject will open up to drawing a bigger picture that shows a general trend in students coming to this school from each country. Not only that but this would also work as a rudimentary datascape that generates more
questions about each country’s familiarity with CMU, its political and economical state, and attitude towards education.
Raw data was extracted from CMU fact book which dates back to 1986. We compiled each year’s headcount of undergraduate and graduate students separately from each country and categorized them into continents and change in time. Excel spreadsheet
was a utilized to organize all data in different priorities, and grasshopper was used to produce bar and line graphs.

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The Map above shows current population of student from each country divided up to graduate and undergraduate studies, with bubbles representing the number of students. While more graduate students come from most countries, a handful represent
more undergraduate students. Ratio of graduate to undergraduate shows the demographic preference for post-secondary education.
The timeline below shows the trend in each country coming to CMU, with its peak year annotated. Analysis of each country’s change in number of students coming to CMU may be an indicator of a nation’s political or economical status.

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